Surgical Margin
Definition of Surgical Margin:
One of the criteria for assessment of the effectiveness of given surgical procedure in achieving the local control of a neoplasm and the adequacy of tumor removal. It is defined by the tissue plane through which the dissection has been done and the actual or potential neoplastic tissue which has been left outside the boundary of a resected specimen within the patient. There are four types of surgical margins: intracapsular or intralesional, marginal, wide, and radical.

The edge or border of the tissue removed in cancer surgery. The margin is described as negative or clean when the pathologist finds no cancer cells at the edge of the tissue, suggesting that all of the cancer has been removed. The margin is described as positive or involved when the pathologist finds cancer cells at the edge of the tissue, suggesting that all of the cancer has not been removed.
Surgical Margin is part of the Diagnostic or Prognostic Factor group
Surgical Margin is also know as:
Margin
Related Terms
Circumferential Resection Margin